This weekend varied from the norm for Damien and I in that we ventured into the wilderness with a team of seven. The trip was an official Mountaineers Climb led by Damien. We do our best to, at least once a season (weather has gotten in the way in past few years), take out a team that includes basic students that we feel are up to a sufferfest challenge. These year our objective was Mount Hinman via the Hinman Glacier. The climb doesn’t have much beta. Although the info we found made it clear that it wasn’t technically challenging. There was even a way to bypass the glacier altogether. The difficulty laid in the approach and the amount of time we decided to a lot for it (2 days instead of 3). Different beta seems to show different mileages, but regardless it was pretty clear that it would be LONG. In the end, the teams’ multiple GPS devices calculated 20 miles total on the summit day.  We knew that to complete what would clearly be a somewhat painful journey, especially on on the last day, we needed a team of positive people who could laugh in the face of fatigue. We assembled what turned out to be the dream team: Ivan, Jose, Jorge, Kara and Rich. Kara and Rich are basic students and this was there very first mountaineering trip. They’re determination and positive energy was remarkable.

We rallied at the Necklace Valley TH at 7:30am on Saturday. The first 5 miles of the trail is relatively flat and forested following the East Fork Foss River. We did, however, cope with stinging nettle thickly growing into the trail for some stretches. I have never run into the vegetation before, but will say that they are aptly named. There were mosquitos as well, though not many.

At mile five we crossed the river on a bridge and then over a long log bridge over a stream. Upon reaching the other side there is a short talus scramble marked by cairns before the dirt tread reappears and heads relentlessly up. Very Very much up! We could not figure out how long this wooded uphill section was. It felt like four miles to the lake, but the sign at the trailhead said it was 2. Our watches varied. Regardless we did eventually emerge tired and sweaty from the forest to the glistening waters of Jade Lake. The trail traverses along the left side of the lake shore. A good portion is submerged under the overflowing lake. Shoe removal was required, but rather refreshing in the afternoon heat. Once we reached dry trail again the team took a long break lounging in the sun and filtering water. The mosquitos increased here, but we released plumes of deet and it worked well. Damien and I indulged in a brief swim in the frigid blue water. I can’t describe how awake I felt after that!

We reluctantly departed Jade Lake and followed a less worn, narrow trail to the head of the valley. We passed several other lakes apparently, but the trail does not go to the shoreline of these. However, there was plenty of running water everywhere. At the end of the valley is 1200 foot pass call La Bohn Gap. We regrouped here and discussed out route options to scale the snow covered pass. It was much steeper than anticipated, especially toward the top. We opted to follow the snow just beside the talus on the left until it ended. Then we would move slightly right and ascend near the center rock island, keeping a far distance though to avoid the moat. Jose broke the track and we made steady upward progress. We started out without crampons, but at the top of the talus we put them on. The grade on the upper portion was about 50 degrees and very exposed over the large rock island and a slightly smaller one as well directly below us. We proceeded with caution and made it to the upper basin without a hitch.

We climbed over to the upper left bench of the basin and arrived at La Bohn Lakes about .25 miles away at 4:30pm. The area was mostly snow covered with several exposed heather patches perfect for camp. We all set up our sleeping systems and filtered water in the melted turquoise portion of one of the smaller lakes. It was difficult to focus on camp chores with the amphitheater of peaks that surrounded us. Truly a magical and secluded wilderness setting for basecamp.

After taking some time to get ourselves situated we re-grouped for dinner and to discuss the morning itinerary. We knew that it would be a 15-17 hour day and thus agreed (after some good natured grumbling) that we would be moving at 3:30am. We examined the portion of the route within view that we would climb by headlamp. It sat just right of the larger La Bohn Lake. After a short snowfield we would need to climb some blocky talus and rock just right of a small waterfall to gain an intermediate small snow slope. Then we were move left, scramble over a 10 foot headwall onto the next snow slope and heather benches until we reached the highest area in our field of vision. By then it would be light.

We all turned in before sunset, but even when darkness fell sleep did not come easy. The moon was so bright it never truly got dark. Heck we could barely see the stars in the moonlight! Our alarms rang at 2:45am.  It was shockingly chilly! The coffee crew boiled water (that is to say everyone but me) and we ate breakfast recounting our nighttime sleep experiences. “No one ever turned the lights out!” Jose said.

At 3:30am we promptly made our way to the blocky talus and began to climb. It is mostly secure climbing. However, some chunks of stone were wobblers and there were several more exposed technical sections that required contemplation, but never above class 3. We put on our crampons at the top of the steep talus slope (marked by a carin) and continued upward. There were 2 gullys that went up the 10 foot headwall guarded by a  small moat easily crossed. The students impressed us by climbing the headwall in crampons (first time) without any hesitation and listening carefully to our coaching.

The team moved to the upper slope and traversed left just 100-200 under the ridgeline crossing some talus bands and checking our GPS. We roped up into 2 teams at 6500 feet well before the glacier, but the traverse was about to get exposed. Split into 2 rope teams, we plodded along enjoying spectacular sunrise views of Sloan, Rainier, Glacier and Baring until we were below a section of the ridge that had a rocky high point. First we thought this was the summit and we made a beeline to the gap in the ridge below the rock pile. It turned out that this was one of many false summits, but it was the way to access the glacier. We crossed to the other side of the ridge and stepped onto Hinman Glacier (no crevasses). We traversed right (backtracking but on the opposite side the ridge). We then regained the ridge several yards from the true summit near some craggy, knife edge looking rocks (Damien placed a picket near the top where it got steeper). Here we un-roped and followed the mellow snow on the ridge to the rocky summit (class 2-).

It was rather windy on the summit so after some photos we took shelter in a moat near the craggy rock ridge for a snack before the journey back to camp. On the way back just after crossing on the other side the ridge we stopped to watch a entrancing performance as streams of clouds blew in fast moving ribbons over the ridge. None of us had ever seen anything like it. Retracing our steps was pretty straight forward and we were back at our tents at 9:45am. We took some time to chill, eat and nap before breaking down camp and departed at 11am for the long haul out.

Descending La Bohn Gap was a bit sketch at this hour. The sun had warmed only the top layer so it was not yet soft enough to plunge step. Yet it was not stiff enough for secure crampon pointing. We descended very slowly some of us using yesterday’s switchbacks and other front pointing face into the slope. The exposure and lack of experience on steep terrain got a little under Kara’s skin, but she never froze up or refused to go down like we’ve seen students do in the past. She listened to the instructors and with determination she made it down the gap. We were all impressed yet again.

From there was an endless march out. Ivan and I kept remarking of long it was from Jade Lake back to the flatter part of trail. We didn’t recollect it being so steep or so infinite! The group congregated at the creek where the flat section of trail began to filter water one last time and then spread out for the final trudge out. It was 5:00 and we had 5 miles to go. Jose decided he wanted to get back by 6 and took off. Damien followed not far behind. Jorge shouldered his pack not to be left out and swiftly disappeared into the trees. We would later find out that the three of them engaged in trail running with fully loaded packs making it back to the TH before the rest of us by 50-70 minutes. Ivan, Kara and Rich took of the rear leaving me to hike in the middle of the pack since, apparently, I have a middle speed gait. The 5 mile final slog through stinging nettle and forest was indeed endless, but I did enjoy the time to myself. It seemed like forever, but soon after the hoots of a barred owl echoed through the trees I emerged into the parking lot to see Jose sleeping in his trunk. Kara, Rich and Ivan appeared ten minutes later at about 7pm. It was the 16 hour, 20 mile sufferfest day we predicted. But I cannot describe how awesome the suffering especially with such an amazing group of mountain people!

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *