Another winter blast this weekend! Damien and I attempted Stillaguamish last year the same exact weekend (in a day), but ended up turning back because some freezing sleet gave us both hypothermia on the ridge. This time we planned on making a second attempt as an overnight and brought a few extra pairs of gloves!

Saturday morning started out with high, grey clouds as we hiked up the nearly level Perry Creek trail which gains 1,300 feet in 3.3 miles (hardly noticeable). Damien and I did not run into any snow patches on the trail until about .25 miles from Perry Falls. Note that these patches we a bit icy, but we did fine without traction. After crossing the river and beginning the steady climb up to Forgotten Meadows, the trail stayed mostly snow free until about 3,700 feet. At this point the track featured a few patches of snow. Around this time intermittent rain also began to fall. With our full goretex armor we hardly noticed the increased moisture! The patches increased in size until snow covered the trail completely. Folks had come up this way though, and there was a solid, compact boot track all the way to Forgotten saddle where the trees parted. Near the saddle we trekked through a trench with 2-foot snow walls!

A blustery wind tussled the snowflakes through the frigid air with gusto as we crested over the top of the ridge on the saddle at 5000 feet (the precipitation had turned to snow at about 4,000 feet). The solid boot pack ended here. There was evidence of tracks heading right along the ridge toward looming Mount Forgotten partly shrouded in wispy layers of mist. However, on our left in the direction of Stillaguamish, there was barely the faintest whisper of some old tracks vaguely detectable in the fresh powder. From our previous attempt last year, we knew there was a descent climbers trail that followed just below the ridge. Damien and I assumed we would have no issue finding our way even with the snow being much deeper than anticipated. We expected there to be at least an indentation of a trail, but there was none!

After traveling a few yards through the deep powder, we opted to slip into our snowshoes. I am really not a fan of the flat shoes, but sometimes it is the best method of travel before ski season. Our journey started out well and we easily followed the broad ridge through trees and open meadows. However, after about .6 miles or so the terrain grew increasingly rugged. Damien and I attempted to follow just below the ridge crest, but got cliffed out. We tried to follow our beta’s suggestion to travel along the top of the crest in the snow, but again geo cliffed out. We continually made attempts traveling at different elevations along the ridge, and got shut down every time by terrain! After roughly two hours with no luck and daylight hours swiftly decreasing, Damien an I decided that, once again, Stillaguamish would have to wait.

We backtracked along the ridge until we reached an open, broad meadow on the ridge crest perhaps .2 miles from the saddle. Here we were granted wide open views of Mount Forgotten, White Chuck and other surrounding peaks, but not for long! The clouds closed in as we set up camp and blotted out the views as snow fluttered with increasing vigor from the darkening sky. It felt like Christmas in this winter wonderland!

When we woke the following morning, the snow fell with even more intensity. Accumulation was surprising little considering how thick and swift the flake fell. It might have been the texture of the snow. It certainly was less fluffy compared to previous weeks. The snow turned to rain at about 4,500 feet as we descended. Back in Perry Creek Valley the mist hug low, giving the mossy trees an eerie and mystical effect. There is beauty in all weather in the mountains.

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