Damien and I were feeling a bit drained from driving the long commute back and forth to Canada for the past few weekends. Although the avalanche danger seemed decent in Duffy Lake, we opted this weekend to take a “rest” and go for a more local objective. After some discussion we settled on an enchainment of Granite Mountain, Tusk O’Granite (aka West Granite) and Pratt Mountain. There is very little ski beta for Granite and no ski information on the other two peaks, let alone a ski enchainment. However, all the summits are winter scrambles, how difficult could it be in skis? Ah famous last words.

We expected cloudy skies on Saturday morning and a few raindrops here and there. However, when we pulled into the Pratt Lake TH parking lot the pitter patter of water on the sunroof was rather consistent. Armed with full Gore-Tex coverage, Damien and I shouldered our packs weighed down by out skis and began up the well-used trail. We expected to reach the snow line within the first mile as we had in Dec 2016. However, instead of snow, we found dirt gleefully decorated with long sheets of ice. Dancing around on slippery ground while lugging skis with no traction resulted in some very fancy footwork.

Damien and I were unable to convert to skinning until about 4300 feet, just above the tree line. By then I felt fatigued from the long journey uphill carting my skis and, on top of that, wearing new boots. In whiteout, stormy conditions Damien and I pressed upward, following a recent snowshoe track that was already getting concealed by the powerful winds. Following the East Ridge, Damien and I summited Granite Mountain mid-afternoon. After admiring a marvelous, close up view of the clouds we began to contemplate our descent to the saddle.

We continued along the windblown ridge, digging our edges into the icy slope. The gentle ridge, dropped off aggressively after several meters. Again, Damien and I strapped our skis to our packs. We faced inward to the slope, using our whippets to slowly descend the steep, icy slope and navigate through some protruding rocks. We even saw blue ice in places!

Once again on soft snow near the low point of the saddle back in the trees, Damien and I put our skis back on and searched for a suitable campsite. We found a small flat area, protected from the fierce winds. For good measure we dug a giant hole for the tent and constructed a fort. We had a three-season tent with us this trip and, thus, didn’t want to take any chances.

Damien and I had a difficult time emerging from the tent the next morning. It’s always a taxing event to get out of your sleeping bag in the winter when you’re so warm and cozy! Eventually, we scampered out of the tent to have breakfast and pack up our home. Due our unhurried pace, we weren’t in our skis until 8:50am, but there was no need to rush.

Damien and I continued along the saddle until it slowly began to rear upward toward the summit of Tusk O’Granite. To our delight, we were able to keep our skis on for the ascent and encountered no ice on the open slopes just before the top. Again, we were granted with mostly a closeup look of the clouds on the summit, but this time we could also see the faded outline of nearby peaks like Katleen and the ridge of Granite Mountain. We descend a few yards down the other side before ripped our skins off in the shelter a small stand of evergreens. Finally, it was time for some turns. The snow was extremely stable and, although it was not powder, it skied well. In fact, Damien and I experienced some very enjoyable turns through open trees and then down a steep, open slope leading to the saddle between Pratt and Tusk O’Granite. I was super stoked with my new ski boots and the stiffness gave me confidence in my turns. Maybe too confident as I crossed my skis on the black diamond hill and took a long, high speed fall somehow missing every protruding rock in my path. My whippet wouldn’t bite, but I managed to stop myself with my ski. After that I was a bit less bold!

We continued down until we reaching the stamped out trail above Olallie Lake on the saddle at 4200 feet. Damien and I took our skis off here. Even though there was snow at this elevation it was extremely hard and iced out. Instead we adhered our climbing skins back to our skis and strapped them to our packs. It was a simple, mostly flat walk along the well-traveled trail to the base of the ridge leading to Pratt. It appeared that the winter scramble route had seen lots of visitation lately good boot pack led right up the ridge. We followed the first few hundred feet in our boots, but converted to skis when we felt the terrain would allow for descent skinning. We had to carry them a few times to get over extremely steep areas near boulders and dense trees just before the tree line. However, once the trees parted Damien and I had a wonderful, easy skin up a gradual incline to the summit. Another view of clouds!

The ski descent from Pratt back to the trail was once again excellent, but short-lived. Once we entered the forest and tried to ski the trail things got a bit spicy with icy snow, steep terrain and dense trees. Basically, it was survival skiing and once again the skis came back off. Luckily, the terrain mellowed out once we returned to the saddle and were able to ski a bit more before we hit a series of creeks forcing us to shoulder our boards again. They stayed on backs for the rest of our long, five mile march out.

There is a reason no one does this enchainment by ski. I don’t think many folks are willing to spend so much time carting their skis on their back! We thought it was fun though… maybe type 2 fun, but we like that kind!

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